Review Category : InSights

The Effects of Base Material Temperature during Installation and In-Service Use

Post-installed adhesive anchor systems have been used for many years for the attachment of threaded rods and reinforcing bars to concrete and other masonry base materials. The code that governs the design of adhesive anchor systems is the American Concrete Institute’s ACI 318-14, Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete, Chapter 17 “Anchoring to Concrete.” The test reference is ACI 355.4, Qualification of Post-Installed Adhesive Anchors in Concrete.

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Humans and Drones Must Work Together

The increased use of drone technology over the last several years has had a positive impact on the field of civil engineering. Drone-based sensing technologies enable engineers to inspect large-scale infrastructure systems faster, and from angles that were previously inaccessible. Drones equipped with reality capture technologies, such as cameras and scanners, promise to be an effective apprentice to inspectors and engineers. These “assistants” will be collecting spatial data about large infrastructure systems at the resolution needed to give engineers a complete picture of infrastructure conditions during both construction and inspection.

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Energy efficiency continues to weave itself into the expectation of building design. Building trades, including Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, and Structural Engineers, are having to modify their general practices. The new requirements of building codes, namely energy codes, are subsequently forcing age-old structural detailing into a new realm.

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Confirming Your Intentions and the Interpretation by Others

There are three aspects of field Quality Assurance for construction projects: Inspection by the Building Official, Special Inspection by the owner’s special inspection agency, and Structural Observation performed by the Engineer of Record (EOR) or his/her designee. All three of these functions are important and non-redundant. As the scale and complexity of a project increases, the more important it becomes that all three functions are provided.

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A Discussion on the Development of the Delamination of Concrete Cover in the Soffit of the Slab

Punching shear behavior is a topic that has attracted much attention from engineers in the last decades because of several collapses caused by punching shear failures. Introducing transverse reinforcement is the most common solution when the geometry of the slab-column connection has to be maintained and punching shear resistance has to be increased.

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Resiliency is “the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties; toughness.” To a structural engineer, this means a strong yet ductile structure that is survivable and repairable in the face of severe environmental loads, such as major earthquakes. In terms of earthquake resiliency, where does our building inventory stand? We have come a long way as you will see, but we have a long way to go.

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Like it or not, design professionals are required to deal with building officials on a regular basis. This is such an important aspect of structural engineering that NCSEA has a committee devoted to it – the Code Officials and Government Agencies Committee. Several member SEA’s also understand the importance of the relationship that structural engineers should have with building officials. A great example is a white paper entitled Guideline – Structural Plan Review Philosophy that was developed by the Structural Engineer’s Association of Washington (SEAW) with the help of the Washington Association of Building Officials (WABO) and is located on the WABO website.

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What, exactly, is it?

I was part of a conversation recently among a group of practitioners where someone wondered about what was studied in an Architectural Engineering (ArchE) program. Earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Architectural Engineering myself, this curiosity surprised me. After all, I had presumed, in the several decades since graduating, Architectural Engineering had surely become ubiquitous in the profession in which most of us practice.

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